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Appetite influences the responses to meal ingestion

Research paper by T. Pribic, A. Nieto, L. Hernandez, C. Malagelada, A. Accarino, F. Azpiroz

Indexed on: 01 Apr '17Published on: 31 Mar '17Published in: Neurogastroenterology & Motility



Abstract

We have previously shown that the postprandial experience includes cognitive sensations, such as satiety and fullness, with a hedonic dimension involving digestive well-being and mood. Preload conditioning has been shown to modulate appetite and food consumption under certain conditions, but its effects on the responses to meal ingestion are not clear. We hypothesized that appetite modulation by preload conditioning has differential effects on the cognitive and the emotive responses to meal ingestion.The effects of preload conditioning (ingestion of a low- vs a high-calorie breakfast) on appetite and on the cognitive and emotive responses to a comfort probe meal ingested 2 hours later (ham and cheese sandwich with orange juice; 300 mL, 425 Kcal) was tested in healthy subjects (n=12) in a cross-over design. Sensations were measured at regular intervals 15 minutes before and 60 minutes after the probe meal.As compared to the low-calorie breakfast, the high-calorie breakfast reduced basal hunger sensation and influenced the responses to the subsequent probe meal: it increased satiety (4.3±0.2 score vs 2.7±0.2 score; P<.001) and fullness (5.4±0.5 score vs 3.1±0.5; P<.001), but reduced the expected postprandial experience of digestive well-being after a palatable meal (1.3±0.7 score vs 3.0±0.3; P=.045).Appetite modulation by preload conditioning has differential effects on the cognitive and emotive responses to a meal. Preload conditioning of the postprandial experience may be applicable to dietary planning and prevention of postprandial symptoms.