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Accuracy of Adverse Drug Reaction Documentation upon Implementation of an Ambulatory Electronic Health Record System

Research paper by Caleb Hui, Regis Vaillancourt; Lissa Bair; Elaine Wong; James W. King

Indexed on: 18 Aug '16Published on: 04 May '16Published in: Drugs - Real World Outcomes



Abstract

Abstract Background Detection, monitoring and treatment of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are paramount to patient safety. The use of a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) system has the potential to address inadequacies in ADR documentation and to facilitate ADR reporting to health agencies. However, effective methods to maintain the quality of documented ADRs within an EHR have not been well studied. Objective To evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of ADR documentation transfer throughout the implementation of a comprehensive EHR system. Methods Retrospective analysis of ADR documentation at a tertiary care pediatric hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. ADRs documented in the newly implemented ambulatory EHR, pharmacy system and hybrid health record system were extracted. Documentation inconsistencies and processes for managing ADR documentation within the EHR were reviewed. Results A total of 115 patients with 260 unique ADRs were identified. Only 155 (60 %) of the identified ADRs were found in the ambulatory EHR system. The remaining 105 ADRs (40 %) were missing from the EHR when it was compared with the other systems. Seventy-two patients (63 %) returned for a follow-up visit, and each had their ADR documentation reviewed in the ambulatory EHR. Following the visit, 44 % of these ambulatory EHR records still included incorrect information. Conclusions We identified discrepancies in ADR documentation within hospital systems, which need to be addressed as healthcare institutions transition to EHRs. Processes related to the transfer of ADR information into the EHR should be clearly defined. To improve the quality of ADR documentation, steps to force complete and continual ADR verification should be introduced at early stages of implementation of a new EHR, and all responsible providers should play a role. Abstract Background Detection, monitoring and treatment of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are paramount to patient safety. The use of a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) system has the potential to address inadequacies in ADR documentation and to facilitate ADR reporting to health agencies. However, effective methods to maintain the quality of documented ADRs within an EHR have not been well studied. BackgroundDetection, monitoring and treatment of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are paramount to patient safety. The use of a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) system has the potential to address inadequacies in ADR documentation and to facilitate ADR reporting to health agencies. However, effective methods to maintain the quality of documented ADRs within an EHR have not been well studied. Objective To evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of ADR documentation transfer throughout the implementation of a comprehensive EHR system. ObjectiveTo evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of ADR documentation transfer throughout the implementation of a comprehensive EHR system. Methods Retrospective analysis of ADR documentation at a tertiary care pediatric hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. ADRs documented in the newly implemented ambulatory EHR, pharmacy system and hybrid health record system were extracted. Documentation inconsistencies and processes for managing ADR documentation within the EHR were reviewed. MethodsRetrospective analysis of ADR documentation at a tertiary care pediatric hospital between January 2013 and June 2014. ADRs documented in the newly implemented ambulatory EHR, pharmacy system and hybrid health record system were extracted. Documentation inconsistencies and processes for managing ADR documentation within the EHR were reviewed. Results A total of 115 patients with 260 unique ADRs were identified. Only 155 (60 %) of the identified ADRs were found in the ambulatory EHR system. The remaining 105 ADRs (40 %) were missing from the EHR when it was compared with the other systems. Seventy-two patients (63 %) returned for a follow-up visit, and each had their ADR documentation reviewed in the ambulatory EHR. Following the visit, 44 % of these ambulatory EHR records still included incorrect information. ResultsA total of 115 patients with 260 unique ADRs were identified. Only 155 (60 %) of the identified ADRs were found in the ambulatory EHR system. The remaining 105 ADRs (40 %) were missing from the EHR when it was compared with the other systems. Seventy-two patients (63 %) returned for a follow-up visit, and each had their ADR documentation reviewed in the ambulatory EHR. Following the visit, 44 % of these ambulatory EHR records still included incorrect information. Conclusions We identified discrepancies in ADR documentation within hospital systems, which need to be addressed as healthcare institutions transition to EHRs. Processes related to the transfer of ADR information into the EHR should be clearly defined. To improve the quality of ADR documentation, steps to force complete and continual ADR verification should be introduced at early stages of implementation of a new EHR, and all responsible providers should play a role. ConclusionsWe identified discrepancies in ADR documentation within hospital systems, which need to be addressed as healthcare institutions transition to EHRs. Processes related to the transfer of ADR information into the EHR should be clearly defined. To improve the quality of ADR documentation, steps to force complete and continual ADR verification should be introduced at early stages of implementation of a new EHR, and all responsible providers should play a role.