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A haplotype of three SNPs in FTO had a strong association with body composition and BMI in Iranian male adolescents.

Research paper by Naser N Kalantari, Nastaran N Keshavarz Mohammadi, Pantea P Izadi, Saeid S Doaei, Maryam M Gholamalizadeh, Hassan H Eini-Zinab, Tuire T Salonurmi, Shahram S Rafieifar, Reza R Janipoor, Ghasem G Azizi Tabesh

Indexed on: 21 Apr '18Published on: 21 Apr '18Published in: PloS one



Abstract

Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are located in the first intron of the FTO gene, are reported to be associated with body weight and the body mass index (BMI). However, their effects on anthropometric measurements in adolescents are poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the association of three adjacent polymorphisms (rs9930506, rs9930501, & rs9932754) in the FTO gene with anthropometric indices in Iranian adolescent males. The participants comprised a total of 237 adolescent males who were recruited randomly from two high schools in Tehran, Iran. The DNA samples were genotyped for the FTO gene polymorphisms by DNA sequencing. BMI, body fat percentage (BF%), and body muscle percentage (BM%) were determined using a validated bioelectrical impedance analysis scale. The association of the FTO polymorphisms with weight, height, BMI, BF%, and BM% was investigated. A haplotype of rs9930506, rs9930501, and rs9932754 (GGT) in the first intron of the FTO with complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) was found to be significantly associated with higher weight (OR = 1.32), BMI (OR = 5.36) and BF% (OR = 1.46), and lower BM% (OR = 3.59) (all P<0.001). None of the students with GGC genotypes were underweight, while all of the students with AAT genotypes had high muscle mass. A haplotype in the first intron of the FTO gene had a strong association with obesity indices in Iranian adolescent males. The FTO gene polymorphisms might have greater effects on anthropometric indices than what was previously imagined. Moreover, we suggested that the FTO gene exerted their effects on anthropometric measurements through haplotypes (and not single SNPs).

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