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A comparison of same setting versus delayed vitrectomy in the management of retained lens fragments after cataract surgery.

Research paper by Anton A Orlin, George G Parlitsis, Ya-Lin YL Chiu, Donald J DJ D'Amico, Robison V Paul RV Chan, Szilárd S Kiss

Indexed on: 08 Jul '14Published on: 08 Jul '14Published in: Retina (Philadelphia, Pa.)



Abstract

Intravitreal retained lens fragments are a rare but potentially serious complication of phacoemulsification. The purpose of this study was to compare same setting ("no wait") vitrectomy with delayed surgery in the management of retained lens fragments in a single academic setting.This study is a retrospective nonrandomized study of all patients undergoing pars plana vitrectomy for retained lens fragments after cataract surgery from 2007 to 2012. Outcomes included visual acuity and the development of various complications such as retinal detachment, elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg, and cystoid macular edema. Multivariate analysis was performed to adjust for potentially confounding variables such as age and preoperative visual acuity.Twenty-eight consecutive eyes (13 same setting, 15 delayed setting) were included in the analysis. Patients in the same setting group were older than in the delayed group (81.00 vs. 72.87 years, P = 0.053). No other preoperative differences existed between the groups (axial length, preoperative vision, and intraocular pressure). The mean time to pars plana vitrectomy in the delayed group was 26.6 days (range, 1-91 days). The mean follow-up time was 363 days (same setting) and 643 days (delayed). At the most recent follow-up, no significant difference existed in mean vision between the same setting (logMAR, 0.42) and the delayed group (logMAR, 0.57) (P = 0.132). Multivariate analysis showed no difference in final vision when adjusting for age and preoperative vision. Although there was a trend for eyes in the same setting group to obtain good vision (≥ 20/40) faster, a higher percentage of eyes in the delayed group obtained good vision at the most recent follow-up (66.7 vs. 23.1%, P = 0.02). More eyes in the delayed group had an intraocular pressure >30 at any point (P = 0.055). There was no significant difference between the groups in any other complications such as retinal detachment, choroidal detachment, and cystoid macular edema during the follow-up.In this cohort, same setting pars plana vitrectomy offers no significant visual acuity advantage over delayed pars plana vitrectomy in patients with retained lens fragments. Fewer eyes in the same setting group "ever" had an intraocular pressure ≥ 30 during follow-up, whereas no other complication differences were seen between the groups.